Vancouver’s Top Chefs Talk Food Trends for 2015

We polled some of the city’s top chefs on the food trends that they think will define Vancouver dining scene this year. Here’s what you might see on your dinner plate in 2015.

Chef Andrea Carlson of Burdock & Co and Harvest Community Foods says…


“For us, our big movement is fermentation. We’ve long been doing pickles and kimchi-type ferments, but we’re putting more lacto ferments from fruits and grains on our menu. We’ve done a sour bran broth for our Agassiz rice risotto, and we’re featuring whole honey-fermented cranberries that have a fun internal fizz to them.”

Chef Dave Gunawan of Farmer’s Apprentice says…

“I think the notion of food security will become more important in 2015. More and more, restaurants are increasingly sourcing locally and we’re starting to see the resurgence of farm names appearing on menus. On a global scale, I think the Nordic movement is still going strong. And fermentation is going to be the next big thing.”


Chef Rob Belcham of Campagnolo Restaurants says…


“We expect to see a resurgence in pickled and fermented foods, and the use of ancient and heirloom grains. Chefs will continue to take more economical meat cuts, like the tongue and heart, and turn them into something delicious. Another trend will be cooking and flavouring food with different types of fats, including lard, duck and goose fat, suet and nut oils.”

J-C Poirier of Ask for Luigi says…


“Say goodbye to kale and quinoa; fermented cabbage, kimchi and seaweed salad will make an entrance. I also think we’ll see a strong Spanish influence. Chefs will continue re-imagining fast food classics with upscale ingredients, and rustic comfort food will be king. I’m hopeful more chefs will embrace the “less is more” philosophy, because it takes a skilled chef to blow your mind with only three ingredients on the plate.”

Chef Brian Skinner says…

“Harissa is the next sriracha. I’ve always loved harissa…the last dish I put on the menu at Acorn was a fried Cauliflower with olive harissa, saffron raisins, and turnips.”

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